WEEK SEVENTEEN

CIRCLES

Creative

Basic Shapes

Incorporate circles into your shot this week.
 
Moderate.jpg
 

This week, find a way to work circles into your composition.  This could be anything from your framing to your subject.  Try using what we've talked about in weeks past to push yourself a little further with this weeks topic.

 
 

Submit your photos by April 29, 2018, by tagging @TRIBETYLER or @TRIBEPRESETS on Instagram and also by using the hashtag #TRIBEwk17.

 

#TRIBEwk17

 

WEEK SIXTEEN

MUSIC

Creative

Create STORY

Instead of a music video, create a photo that tells the story of a song, or a line of any song you like.
 
Moderate.jpg
 

This week, go somewhere and shoot while you're listening to your favorite music.  Get inspired and share an image that tells a story of the song (or line of a song) that you choose.  

While we were in Cambridge, England, I came across a wall with the words "TO THE RIVER" written on it with chalk.  I'm a big Manchester Orchestra fan so this shot always reminds me of their song, "The River."

(Listen Below)

 
 

Submit your photos by April 22, 2018, by tagging @TRIBETYLER or @TRIBEPRESETS on Instagram and also by using the hashtag #TRIBEwk16.

 

#TRIBEwk16

 

WEEK FIFTEEN

RHYTHM

Seeing

Create Energy

Capture a sense of rhythm by finding patterns of either light or a subject to make an interesting composition.
 
Moderate.jpg
 
P1480531.00_00_31_18.Still001.jpg
 
 

Submit your photos by April 15, 2018, by tagging @TRIBETYLER or @TRIBEPRESETS on Instagram and also by using the hashtag #TRIBEwk15.

 

 

FEATURE OF THE WEEK

 

#TRIBEwk15

 

WEEK FOURTEEN

ANALOG SIMULATION

Challenge

BACK TO THE ROOTS

Limit yourself to only 36 exposures for the entire week.
NO PEEKING! Don't review your photos until all 36 are shot and uploaded to your editing software. (Make sure your settings are correct in camera.  Make every shot count.)
Choose the best shot from the "roll" and upload to instagram with #TRIBEwk14
*Optional: Shoot with a fixed iso for all 36 exposures.
 
Hard.jpg
 

Submit your photos by April 8, 2018, by tagging @TRIBETYLER or @TRIBEPRESETS on Instagram and also by using the hashtag #TRIBEwk14.

 

FEATURE OF THE WEEK

 
 

#TRIBEwk14

 

WEEK THIRTEEN

COLOR HARMONY

Seeing

CREATING THE MOOD

Compose a shot achieving an intentional color scheme. (Complementary, or Gradient)
 
Moderate.jpg
 
 
2000px-BYR_color_wheel.png
 

Constantly practicing and understanding color harmony is the X-factor to photography.  Color affects the overall mood of an image, and once you learn to look for it in every shot, your photography will improve dramatically.  

This week try finding a subject or subjects that demonstrate a balance of complementary colors or a color gradient.  Complementary colors are colors that sit across from each other on the color wheel.  Watch the video above and take a look at the samples below to see the difference between complimentary colors and color gradients.

 
 

Submit your photos by April 1, 2018, by tagging @TRIBETYLER or @TRIBEPRESETS on Instagram and also by using the hashtag #TRIBEwk13.

 
 
 

FEATURE OF THE WEEK

 
 

#TRIBEwk13

 

WEEK TWELVE

FRAME WITHIN A FRAME

Seeing

A PHOTO WITHIN A PHOTO

Capture a frame within your photo that assists in drawing attention to your subject.
 
Moderate.jpg
 
 
 

Using natural "frames" within a composition can help assist in emphasizing a subject.  Try looking for natural frames that help ad to your story and draw the eye to focus on your subject.

Submit your photos by March 25, 2018, by tagging @TRIBETYLER or @TRIBEPRESETS on Instagram and also by using the hashtag #TRIBEwk12.

 

FEATURE OF THE WEEK

#TRIBEwk12

 

WEEK ELEVEN

HOME

Creative

HOME SWEET HOME

Capture the essence of what makes your home, or hometown unique.
 
Moderate.jpg
 
 
 

Think of what makes your home, town, or city unique.  This is the thing you show to people who come to visit.  Something that speaks for itself.  This week push yourself and apply everything we've talked about to capture a story.

Submit your photos by March 18, 2018, by tagging @TRIBETYLER or @TRIBEPRESETS on Instagram and also by using the hashtag #TRIBEwk11.

 

FEATURE OF THE WEEK

 
 

#TRIBEwk11

 

WEEK TEN

SOFT LIGHT

Creative

Chasing The Light

Display an interesting use of soft lighting.
 
Easy.jpg
 

Soft light is a situation in which your subject is in an indirect path of the light source.  This tends to create less contrast and more subtle shadows.  As with everything we've talked about thus far, recognizing and understanding how to use soft light is an invaluable tool to your overall improvement as a photographer.

 
 

Again, this week you're making the rules and taking creative control.  Shoot whatever you find interesting that shows a good example of using soft light to your advantage.  

Submit your photos by March 11, 2018, by tagging @TRIBETYLER or @TRIBEPRESETS on Instagram and also by using the hashtag #TRIBEwk10.

 

FEATURE OF THE WEEK

 
 

#TRIBEwk10

 

WEEK NINE

HARD LIGHT

Creative

Chasing The Light

Display an interesting use of hard lighting.
 
Easy.jpg
 

Hard, or harsh light, is a situation in which your subject is in the direct path of the light source.  This tends to create a greater contrast and more defined shadows.  As with everything we've talked about thus far, recognizing and understanding how to use hard light is an invaluable tool to your overall improvement as a photographer.

 
 

Again, this week you're making the rules and taking creative control.  Shoot whatever you find interesting that shows a good example of using hard light to your advantage.  

Submit your photos by March 4, 2018, by tagging @TRIBETYLER or @TRIBEPRESETS on Instagram and also by using the hashtag #TRIBEwk9.

 
 
 

FEATURE OF THE WEEK

#TRIBEwk9

 

WEEK EIGHT

SELECTIVE B&W

Creative

Recognise Color

Find and shoot ONLY black and white subjects without a black and white filter.
(one other selective color optional)
 
Easy.jpg
 

For this week's assignment, try to implement what we've talked about over the first seven weeks to help create a more interesting composition.  Pay close attention to every aspect of your frame and try to make your shot look like a black and white photo without editing or using a black and white filter.  To further display the natural use of black and white,  you can include a single color to help make your photo pop.

This week, you make the rules.  Shoot whatever subject you find interesting.  In the coming weeks we'll be talking about how to use more colors to convey a mood and how you can use color to create harmony in an image, but for now, we'll just start with the basics.  

 

 

Submit your photos by February 25, 2018, by tagging @TRIBETYLER or @TRIBEPRESETS on Instagram and also by using the hashtag #TRIBEwk8.

 

 

FEATURE OF THE WEEK

 
 
 

#TRIBEwk8

 

WEEK SEVEN

SHUTTER SPEED

Technical

CREATE ENERGY.

Shoot with shutter priority to assist in creating an interesting composition while capturing movement.
 
Easy.jpg
 

In week seven, we'll continue with another technical challenge.   Like aperture, being conscious of your shutter speed can help assist you in a variety of ways.  Whether it be getting a crisp shot of a hummingbird in flight, or creating energy by showing movement in an image, shutter speed is another tool that can drastically affect the mood of an image.

What is SHUTTER SPEED?

To put it simply, shutter speed is how quickly (or slow) your shutter opens and closes.  Shutter speed makes up 1/3 of the exposure triangle we talked about last week with aperture and ISO taking up the other 2 sides.  In photography, every action is give and take.  In the video above, I demonstrate how the exposure triangle works and how every action is countered with a different reaction in regards to getting the correct exposure.

Understanding the exposure triangle and understanding when to shoot with aperture priority, shutter priority, or even manual, will give you complete control and help you in getting your shots to turn out exactly how you envision them.  For a better explanation on shooting with shutter priority and how the exposure triangle works, see the video above.

For this week's assignment, try shooting with shutter priority to capture movement then share what your settings were and why.  This will be a tool that we'll be revisiting for the rest of the year.

 

 

Submit your photos by February 18, 2018, by tagging @TRIBETYLER or @TRIBEPRESETS on Instagram and also by using the hashtag #TRIBEwk7.

 

FEATURE OF THE WEEK

 
 
 
 

#TRIBEwk7

 

WEEK SIX

APERTURE

Technical

FOCUS ON YOUR SUBJECT.

Shoot with aperture priority to assist in isolating your subject and creating an interesting composition.
 
Easy.jpg
 

Week six is the first week we'll be taking on a technical challenge.  An aperture is a tool that can be used in many different ways.  Whether it be assisting your shots in low-light situations, or used to help isolate your subject from a noisy background, aperture is another term that you'll be using as long as you're taking pictures.

What is aperture?

Aperture (F-stop), to put simply, is how wide the shutter in your lens opens to let light into the camera.  There are benefits to opening as wide as possible, as there are to keeping the shutter narrow.  For example, on a bright sunny day, an aperture of F/22 will allow you to shoot motion without having to use an ND filter - but we'll get to that later.  In addition to letting more or less light into the camera, which aperture you choose can also have a major effect on the way your image is perceived.

As seen in the chart below, a faster aperture (lower number) not only lets in more light but will further help to isolate your subject by creating an effect called "Bokeh."  Bokeh is the blur that's produced in the out of focus parts of the image.  You may be able to use bokeh to your advantage to create separation between a subject and a noisy background.  The blur from the shallow depth of field will make the focal point more dramatic and immediately draw the viewers eye to that point.  Think of it as a way to create another form of a natural leading line.

For this week's assignment, try using a certain aperture to your advantage then share what your settings were and why.  By doing this, we'll be able to see and analyze each other's techniques and styles to further help influence your own style.

For more information about this week, watch the video above.

 

 

Submit your photos by February 11, 2018, by tagging @TRIBETYLER or @TRIBEPRESETS on Instagram and also by using the hashtag #TRIBEwk6.

85mm f/ 1.8

35mm f/4

105mm f/4

 

 

FEATURE OF THE WEEK

 

#TRIBEwk6

 

WEEK FIVE

STORY

Storytelling

Worth 1,000 words.

Tell a story with a single image using the techniques we've covered over the first four weeks. (Rule of Thirds, Negative Space, and Leading Lines.)
 
Hard.jpg
 

"A picture is worth 1,000 words" is a statement that is far too true.  A good photo doesn't only follow the rules of what makes a "good" composition, a good photo makes someone feel something.  Whether that be love, anger, happiness, sadness, or even inspiration, a good photo, a lot of times, lives beyond the frame in which it's captured.

This past weekend we celebrated our nephew's 4th birthday.  While I was taking hundreds of photos, his energy made me realize how much life you can capture in a single frame.  Being able to see someone in a certain moment, or capturing a natural reaction for me, is what makes photography so rewarding.  For this week's assignment, we're going to take a break from focusing solely on the technicalities of photography and focus on the most important piece.  Your subject.

 
 

This week, try using the composition techniques we've learned over the first four weeks to try and tell a story with a single photo.  Like we did with our self-portraits,  I want to use this week as a gauge as we move on with the 52-week photo challenge.  We will be looking back, later on, to see what we can directly do and what we've done, to improve our shots for the better.  

Once again, this week try focusing on what your subject is, and what surrounds it to help give the viewer a better understanding.  If your goal is to one day be able to make a living off of photography, being able to effectively tell a story in a powerful and unique way is the biggest way to stand out and start getting discovered.

 

 

Submit your photos by February 4, 2018, by tagging @TRIBETYLER or @TRIBEPRESETS on Instagram and also by using the hashtag #TRIBEwk5.

 

 

FEATURE OF THE WEEK

 

#TRIBEwk5

 

WEEK FOUR

LEADING LINES

Composition

Control the eye

Look for leading lines to direct the viewer's eye through your photo.
 
Moderate.jpg
 

This week we're taking what we've learned and we're continuing to build on the rule of thirds and negative space with another pillar of compositional techniques. 

Leading Lines.

what are leading lines?

Leading lines are the subliminal lines that lead your eye through an image.  Leading lines can come from hard physical lines to shadows or any object that creates a line that emphasizes your subject.  For example,  the shots below make for interesting compositions because there are leading lines in the photos that all converge to one point or area.  These lines help to control the viewer's eye into the frame and gives an inviting feeling into an image.  Another reason paying attention to leading lines is important is to further emphasize your subject.  Like negative space, the lines that are chosen around the subject adds depth to the photo that many people overlook.  Leading lines are essentially a way to take a 2D image and create more depth by giving it a false third dimension. 

 
 

Finding leading lines in nature tends to take a lot of patients, especially when photographing life.  In this case, try lining up the lines in a scene and wait for your subject to walk through the frame and try snapping off a photo where the lines intersect.  If shooting an inanimate object, try positioning yourself or adjusting your scene to create an interesting flow to your focal point. 

Once again, like the rule of thirds and negative space, this is another tool that can be built on that will dramatically change the way you see everything  Try using what we've learned about the rule of thirds and negative space, and find leading lines that invite you into an image or emphasize a specific subject.

Look at some of the slider examples below for different ways of seeing leading lines.

 

 

Submit your photos by January 28, 2018, by tagging @TRIBETYLER or @TRIBEPRESETS on Instagram and also by using the hashtag #TRIBEwk4.

 
 
 

 

Feature Of The Week

 
 
 

#TRIBEwk4

 

WEEK THREE

Negative Space

Composition

SEE THE UNSEEN

Use negative space to highlight a subject and create a more dynamic composition.
 
Moderate.jpg
 

This week is probably one of the most important topics we will cover.  Like the rule of thirds, negative space is in every image whether you realize it or not.  By being able to see scenes and images by their negative space and learning how to use it to your advantage, will instantly improve your photography all across the board.

what is negative space?

Negative space, to put it simply, is the spaces other than your subject in an image.  (In the example below, the positive space is the plant while the white wall occupies the negative space.)  That doesn't necessarily mean that the background has to be either black or white.  Negative space can be created with colors, shapes, light, a shallow depth of field, etc.  Like everything in photography, there isn't just one way to do it.  It's actually quite the opposite, as finding new ways to achieve negative space in your images will make you a more dynamic photographer.

Even though on the surface it seems that negative space only applies to a minimalistic style,  it's actually applied to every photograph, intentionally or not.  By recognizing the negative space in your shots you'll be able to isolate your subject and spend more of the frame telling the story. 

B76A0285.jpg

A really good example of first starting to recognize negative space is by looking through "beautiful" Instagram feeds.  We all have people we follow and wonder how they make every shot seem to fit in with the last even if the lighting, colors, and subject are completely different.  The reason this resonates with most people as "beautiful" is the use of negative space, which allows the eye to rest and be gently led into the next photo.  

Like the rule of thirds, negative space is another tool that can help to organize chaos and take something that is seemingly uninteresting and make it look compelling.  If there is one thing I would hope for you to take away from the 52-week challenge, it's being able to see negative space in every shot.

Look at some of the examples below and use the sliders to get a better understanding of how to see negative space.

 

 

Submit your photos by January 21, 2018, by tagging @TRIBETYLER or @TRIBEPRESETS on Instagram and also by using the hashtag #TRIBEwk3.

 
 

Negative Space created by a shallow depth of field

Negative Space created with color.

Negative Space created with light (and shadows).

Negative Space created with scale.

 

FEATURE OF THE WEEK

 

#TRIBEwk3

 
 

WEEK TWO

Rule of Thirds

Composition

BACK TO THE BASICS

Use the rule of thirds to create an interesting composition.
 
Easy.jpg
 

We're going to start off this 52-week challenge with the basics and go more in depth later in the year which will hopefully bring everyone up to speed.  Ultimately, I would hope for you to build onto every week using the techniques we use in the weeks prior.  During this project, we'll be breaking down the steps of different techniques.  To which, you'll later be able to mix and match and apply them to a subject as a whole where it's less intimidating.  You have to learn to walk before you can run.

With that being said, this week we'll be talking about one of the first steps in photo composition, the rule of thirds.  While the rule of thirds is one of the most basic "rules" of photography, it is really one of the easiest ways to start seeing things differently.  To start to understand the rule of thirds, imagine the frame being broken down into 3 equal parts both horizontally and vertically.  By aligning your subject on one of these lines or where these lines converge, creates "power points," if you will. These "power points" are where you can attract the eye and make for a more visually pleasing composition.  By using the rule of thirds, you'll be able to create a better balance and naturally help the eye move throughout the photo. 

See the examples below using the sliders to get a better understanding of how to use the rule of thirds.

 

 

Submit your photos by January 14, 2018, by tagging @TRIBETYLER or @TRIBEPRESETS and also by using the hashtag #TRIBEwk2.

Tip: CLEAN UP YOUR LINES Keeping your lines straight will immediately improve your photos.  Achieve this by keeping the camera square to what you're shooting.  Try editing with a grid and skewing your lines in Lightroom or SKWRT if you're on mobile.

RULE OF THIRDS NOT APPLIED

RULE OF THIRDS APPLIED

RULE OF THIRDS NOT APPLIED

RULE OF THIRDS APPLIED

FEATURE OF THE WEEK

#TRIBEwk2

 
 

WEEK ONE

Self-Portrait

We're going to start off our year-long journey with a "before" photo.  We have a lot to learn over the course of the next 52 weeks so let's start with what we already know. 

Compose a self-portrait any way you know how.  

It could be set up with a timer on a tripod, a reflection in a mirror, or even your arm.  Really be creative. 

Try taking multiple shots and different compositions and choose the best one you feel represents yourself and your style.  We'll be referring back to these shots next week to see how we can improve.  Don't spend too much time trying to get fancy with different settings.  Focus mainly on your composition (or what you know) of it here.

Submit your photos by January 7, 2018, by tagging @TRIBETYLER or @TRIBEPRESETS and also by using the hashtag #TRIBEwk1.

I took around 25 photos of my self-portrait and narrowed that down to my favorite 4.  Once I was down to my favorite 4, I focused on the little details of which one I wanted to choose and why (see below).  I ended up choosing the photo of my cropped face because I really liked how the amount of negative space and the smoothness of the plain white background really draws the eye to my eyes.  When shooting portraits, I've found the most important part of the whole image is the eyes as that is what tends to draw the strongest connection with the viewer.

FULL VIDEO

FEATURE OF THE WEEK

#TRIBEwk1